Gratitude for the Merit of the Age – My Dream on April 26, 14


This dream came to me as a result of my internal (spiritual) goal to choose gratitude over complaint.  I see this effort bearing fruit in my life.
In my dream, I’m visiting Chapman University. I meet the University President, who gives me a tour. I’m telling him about how my Dad worked at the college when I was in 2nd grade. We used to play on campus while waiting for him to get off work. The President shows me around, pointing out all of the improvements made over the years.

It strikes me that countless people were involved in working together to build something wonderful. I feel an overwhelming sense of gratitude for each person who contributed over the years toward making Chapman University what it is today. As the parent of a college student, I realize the magnitude of the blessings conferred on every student by the investments of these predecessors.

I feel that the value of each person’s efforts should be appreciated, from the anonymous groundskeepers and janitors, to the construction workers, and all of the alumni who contributed, from the smallest donation to the largest.

A profound sense of gratitude settles over me. As I wake up I feel the implications of gratitude for all of our predecessors who invested their love and effort, not just in Chapman, but for all institutions, such as my own company, UC Berkeley, Dartmouth, etc., and for all the saints who trod this path before us.

The Gratitude Game


Susan Cain, the author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, wrote a blog post on Ecclesiastes Chapter 8. Here’s her original post.>>—-> How to Enjoy Tranquility Through All of Life’s Trials

Here’s my comment on her post. Rejoicing makes sense to me even if there’s nothing in particular to rejoice about. I recently read in a review of, Thanks!: How the New Science of Gratitude Can Make You Happier, that the secret to happiness is gratitude. It rings true for me.

I make it a spiritual practice to challenge myself to look for unusual things to be grateful for–like dirt . . . and worms. Yep. As a gardener, those are two essentials for a successful garden.

Another favorite thing to be grateful for is books; books full of words, and libraries full of books, free for the borrowing. I’m grateful for parents who read stories to me, teachers who taught me to read and even one special children’s librarian who got me totally hooked on books in the third grade.

How about color vision? I’m grateful to have color vision. God made the world such a vibrantly colorful place, but without color vision we wouldn’t be able to appreciate its natural beauty.

What would you do if you were color-blind? I was surprised to hear that Monte Roberts, The Man Who Listens To Horses, is color-blind. Not only that, he is grateful that he is color-blind and looks on it as a gift. He says that his color-blindness enabled him to see what others couldn’t see in horse’s communication dynamics. He attributes his amazing ability to communicate with horses to his color-blindness.

I’m grateful for my introverted character. I encounter many obstacles misunderstanding and even prejudice in the workplace. Like Monte’s color-blindness, I see introversion as a gift. It gives me a unique perspective on the world and allows me to see what many extroverts miss. They may think I’m missing out on the vibrant colors of an extroverted life, but I wouldn’t trade my introversion in for anything. (Even a Lexus.)

(Dear @Lexus, you owe introverts an apology)